Mathematical Software and Free Documents 31

Day

Organizers

  • NORO, Masayuki (Rikkyo University)
  • TAKAYAMA, Nobuki (Kobe University)
  • HAMADA, Tatsuyoshi (Nihon University / OCAMI)
  • YOKOYAMA, Shun-ichi (Tokyo Metropolitan University)

Support

  • MSJ Committee for Network Administration

Speakers (Alphabetical order)

  • FUJIMOTO, Mitsushi (University of Teacher Education Fukuoka)
  • SATO, Kenta (RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research)
  • YOSHIDA, Jun (The University of Tokyo)

Program

  • 15:00–15:50 “Computing cycles in Khovanov homology”, YOSHIDA, Jun (The University of Tokyo)
  • 16:00–16:50 “GeoGebra scripting tutorial”, FUJIMOTO, Mitsushi (University of Teacher Education Fukuoka)
  • 17:00–17:50 “At the core of the Julia language — multiple dispatching and metaprogramming”, SATO, Kenta (RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research)

Abstract

  • 15:00–15:50 “Computing cycles in Khovanov homology”, YOSHIDA, Jun (The University of Tokyo)
    • I introduce a program that computes Khovanov homology as an example of use of compute in pure mathematical research. Khovanov homology is a knot/link invariant developed by Khovanov in 2000 as a categorification of Jones polynomial. Recently, N.Ito and I constructed a map on Khovanov homology that realizes the crossing-change operation of knots/links. In the research, we used the program to see the behaviors of the map. In this talk, we will verify some of our results by using it.
  • 16:00–16:50 “GeoGebra scripting tutorial”, FUJIMOTO, Mitsushi (University of Teacher Education Fukuoka)
    • Two scripting languages, GGBScript and JavaScript, are available on GeoGebra. We can create useful GeoGebra applets by using them. In this talk, we will give a tutorial about GeoGebra scripting through making 15 puzzle and Eulerian circuit applets for GeoGebra beginners.
  • 17:00–17:50 “At the core of the Julia language — multiple dispatching and metaprogramming”, SATO, Kenta (RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research)
    • The Julia programming language, which has been attracting attention from the community of scientific and technical computing, is sometimes underrated as a “fast language.” However, its multiple dispatching and metaprogramming features are the truly essential part of the language. In this talk, I will explain why they are effective and how useful in practice by introducing several real-world examples.